Consumer

Consumer

There are approximately 400 species of Medinilla, of which untill now only the Magnifica is supplied as a houseplant. The family name of the Medinilla is Melastomataceae. Medinilla Magnifica finds its origin in the Philippines, it’s a epifyt. it grows there on trees in the mountains, but does not withdraw its food from those trees such as parasites. The type Magnifica is the only Medinilla with splendid pink flyleaves to the large flower. Late king Boudewijn of Belgium was a big devotee of Medinilla. He grew them in the royal conservatories and they flaunted on the bank note of 10,000 Belgian francs. The growing of Medinilla’s in greenhouses was a great succes so that now everyone can enjoy the beauty of Medinilla. Rob Herwig the recognised plant book writer called the Medinilla Magnifica, ‘the Rolls Royce under the houseplants’. The Medinilla are an acquisition for every house chamber and they look splendid in offices also, It is a very exclusive plant, which you can enjoy for a long time. Certainly if you give the correct care which you can find on this site. The beautifull pink flowers which can grow to a length of approximately 50cm are a joy to behold.

Caring tips

Temperature: The ideal temperature for this plant is 17 to 25 ºC. Position: The Medinilla likes a lot of light. From 1 November to 1 March it can tolerate direct sunlight but protect it from direct sunlight during the period 1 March to 1 November. Care: Be careful with watering. The Medinilla prefers being a bit dry to being too damp. Therefore only water the plant moderately and do not allow any water to remain in the bottom of the pot. You do not need to fertilize the Medinilla before it is done flowering because the grower added enough fertilizer for that period. After the flowering period fertilizer can be given once every two weeks as then the plant is growing new shoots. Medinilla loves being sprayed. The pink flower is made up of many trussed small flowers with 1 or 2 garlands and can grow to about 50 cm long. If you look carefully you can see the delicate purple anthers sticking out of the trumpet-shaped flowers. This small detail is the finishing touch of the flower and is its hallmark. After the flowering period it is advisable to remove the old flowers to facilitate the plant’s further growth. Then the plant will produce new leaves where the flowers were located. Once these have unfurled it is important to place the plant in a cooler position (17 to 18°C) to facilitate bud formation in the young leaves. If the buds are clearly visible then the plant can be returned to its normal temperature so that the buds can develop further into a new magnificent flower. In principle the plant can be repotted throughout the year although this should not be done in the flowering period due to the delicate nature of the flower. If necessary the plant can then be pruned but allway’s leave one pair of leaves on a branche otherwise that branche will die.